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Description

*Printable online certificate available upon completion of course*

Cryptography has been used for thousands of years to help to provide confidential communications between mutually trusted parties. In its most basic form, two people, often denoted as Alice and Bob, have agreed on a particular secret key. At some later time, Alice may wish to send a secret message to Bob (or Bob might want to send a message to Alice). The key is used to transform the original message (which is usually termed the plaintext) into a scrambled form that is unintelligible to anyone who does not possess the key. This process is called encryption and the scrambled message is called the ciphertext. When Bob receives the ciphertext, he can use the key to transform the ciphertext back into the original plaintext; this is the decryption process. A cryptosystem constitutes a complete specification of the keys and how they are used to encrypt and decrypt information. Various types of cryptosystems of increasing sophistication have been used for many purposes throughout history. Important  applications have included sensitive communications between political leaders and/or royalty, military maneuvers, etc. However, with the development of the internet and applications such as electronic commerce, many new diverse applications have emerged. These include scenarios such as encryption of passwords, credit card numbers, email, documents, files, and digital media.

It should also be mentioned that cryptographic techniques are also widely used to protect stored data in addition to data that is transmitted from one party to another. For example, users may wish to encrypt data stored on laptops, on external hard disks, in the cloud, in databases, etc. Additionally, it might be useful to be able to perform computations on encrypted data (without first decrypting the data).

The development and deployment of a cryptosystem must address the issue of security. Traditionally, the threat that cryptography addressed was that of an eavesdropping adversary who might intercept the ciphertext and attempt to decrypt it. If the adversary happens to possess the key, then there is nothing that can be done. Thus the main security consideration involves an adversary who does not possess the key, who is still trying to decrypt the ciphertext. The techniques used by the adversary to attempt to “break” the cryptosystem are termed cryptanalysis. The most obvious type of cryptanalysis is to try to guess the key. An attack wherein the adversary tries to decrypt the ciphertext with every possible key in turn is termed an exhaustive key search. When the adversary tries the correct key, the plaintext will be found, but when any other key is used, the “decrypted” ciphertext will likely be random gibberish. So an obvious first step in designing a secure cryptosystem is to specify a very large number of possible keys, so many that the adversary will not be able to test them all in any reasonable amount of time.

Who this course is for:

  • Anyone interested in Modern Cryptography
  • Anyone interested in Cryptography
  • Anyone interested in Crypto Algorithms

What you’ll learn

  • Cryptography Fundamentals
  • Securing Files
  • AES Encryption
  • RSA Encryption
  • Asymmetric Encryption
  • Symmetric Encryption
  • Quantum Cryptography
  • AES 256 Encryption
  • Types of Encryption
  • XOR encryption
  • SHA256 Encryption
  • Pricate Key Cryptography
  • Encrypt Decrypt
  • 3DES Encryption
  • DES Ecryption

HOMEPAGE – https://www.anonymz.com/…cryptography-fundamentals-modern-security-and-cracking/

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